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It seems that our brain works in synchrony during music therapy

on 26 July 2019
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music to my ears

This research points out the positive connection between therapy and music. Scientists have discovered that certain music really can strike a chord or two that helps us to find a connection at the deeper levels of our mind . . . 

This is a really interesting study and one I suppose many therapists, as well as clients, can relate to, that aha moment kind of thing. While hypnotherapy would not specifically be called music therapy, soft relaxing music is a very integral part of the process. And because of the way the frontal lobes are connected to so many other regions, particularly those relating to sound, this just makes so much sense! It s also the case in hypnotherapy, that the therapist can actually detect the relative depth of a clients trance and so, there appears to be a correlation between depth of trance and the potential of a positive outcome.

So, the idea of discovering more about how and why this happens and what, if any, the music plays a part, is something to look out for in the future. For the moment though, we'll work to build on what we know and that is, accompanied by music, hypnotherapy really is a great tool to help you rebuild your lofe and let go!

Hypnotherapy stands out as one of the most effective strategic life management methods there is, especially in its ability to promote clear thinking and good states of mental wellness. The behaviours that make life challenging are often a result of too much stress, too little sleep and too little by way of clarity! So, to get or take back control of your mind and your life, it makes perfect sense to use a methodology that addresses the subconscious mind's role in perpetuating negative, vague and ambiguous states of mind. Hypnosis helps us to create calm relaxing states of mind that make life work better! If you would like to address any concerns you have in this direction, or, if you just want to make your life feel better, then why not make an appointment for a Free Consultation? Hypnosis gives you the ability to have a good life! 

The objective here is to help people understand how and why we become illogically trapped into irrational emotional experiences that may actually be happening for reasons different to that which we would imagine! If you want to know more about how Hypnotherapy can help you; why not make an appointment for a Free Consultation?

For more information on the Free Consultation - Go Here or to book your Free Consultation today, you can do so here


The Research:

For the first time, researchers have been able to demonstrate that the brains of a patient and therapist become synchronised during a music therapy session, a breakthrough that could improve future interactions between patients and therapists.

The research, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, was carried out by Professor Jorg Fachner and Dr Clemens Maidhof of Anglia Ruskin University (ARU).

This is the first music therapy study to use a procedure called hyperscanning, which records activity in two brains at the same time, allowing researchers to better understand how people interact.

During the session documented in the study, classical music was played as the patient discussed a serious illness in her family. Both patient and therapist wore EEG (electroencephalogram) caps containing sensors, which capture electrical signals in the brain, and the session was recorded in sync with the EEG using video cameras.

Music therapists work towards "moments of change," where they make a meaningful connection with their patient. At one point during this study, the patient's brain activity shifted suddenly from displaying deep negative feelings to a positive peak. Moments later, as the therapist realised the session was working, her scan displayed similar results. In subsequent interviews, both identified that as a moment when they felt the therapy was really working.

The researchers examined activity in the brain's right and left frontal lobes where negative and positive emotions are processed, respectively. By analysing hyperscanning data alongside video footage and a transcript of the session, the researchers were able to demonstrate that brain synchronisation occurs, and also show what a patient-therapist "moment of change" looks like inside the brain.

Lead author Jorg Fachner, Professor of Music, Health and the Brain at Anglia Ruskin University (ARU), said: "This study is a milestone in music therapy research. Music therapists report experiencing emotional changes and connections during therapy, and we've been able to confirm this using data from the brain.

"Music, used therapeutically, can improve wellbeing, and treat conditions including anxiety, depression, autism and dementia. Music therapists have had to rely on the patient's response to judge whether this is working, but by using hyper scanning we can see exactly what is happening in the patient's brain.

"Hyperscanning can show the tiny, otherwise imperceptible, changes that take place during therapy. By highlighting the precise points where sessions have worked best, it could be particularly useful when treating patients for whom verbal communication is challenging. Our findings could also help to better understand emotional processing in other therapeutic interactions."

Story Source:

Materials provided by Anglia Ruskin UniversityNote: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

  1. Jörg C. Fachner, Clemens Maidhof, Denise Grocke, Inge Nygaard Pedersen, Gro Trondalen, Gerhard Tucek, Lars O. Bonde. “Telling me not to worry…” Hyperscanning and Neural Dynamics of Emotion Processing During Guided Imagery and MusicFrontiers in Psychology, 2019; 10 DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01561

Cite This Page:

Anglia Ruskin University. "Brains work in sync during music therapy: Researchers make major breakthrough using brain hyperscanning." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 July 2019. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190725114346.htm>.